Counting the number of rows in a table

spaghettidba

Don’t be fooled by the title of this post: while counting the number of rows in a table is a trivial task for you, it is not trivial at all for SQL Server.

Every time you run your COUNT(*) query, SQL Server has to scan an index or a heap to calculate that seemingly innocuous number and send it to your application. This means a lot of unnecessary reads and unnecessary blocking.

Jes Schultz Borland blogged about it some time ago and also Aaron Bertrand has a blog post on this subject. I will refrain from repeating here what they both said: go read their blogs to understand why COUNT(*) is a not a good tool for this task.

The alternative to COUNT(*) is reading the count from the table metadata, querying sys.partitions, something along these lines:

Many variations of this query include JOINs to sys.tables, sys.schemas or sys.indexes, which are not strictly necessary in…

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