Agile@School 2017 – obstacles on the path

Hello everyone,

As mentioned in the previous post, the project has been started and we’ve reached the “fourth episode”. This time, Alessandro and I were able to talk with students in order to get which kind of project they are going to complete and show during the final exam.

Like every other project, problems are behind the corner. Indeed, the students didn’t create any task under the related Product Backlog Items. This is what they should have done. The issues were principally:

  • some teams still not had figured any idea to implement
  • some other weren’t able to use Visual Studio Team Services (VSTS) in the right way (or few of them simply didn’t wanted to 🙂 )

That’s it, so our last meeting was focused on explaining the advantages of agile methodologies instead of the classic waterfall approach, showing them how to use VSTS correctly in order to clarify any doubt about its use. We started to speak about methodologies because they used to waterfall their project, and this means that they were gathering ideas, instead of thinking in an iterative way.

Although this fact, we could see the first results from the majority of the students which let us being confident about the future of their projects.

As result of this talk, the students seemed to have got why choose a methodology instead of another, being able to manage their work with the right tools. At the end of this day, we’ve assigned them just a simple homework: create the tasks which reflects their development steps, moving PBIs through different status during their work.

That was all for this episode. Stay tuned for any news about the course of the project.

See you to the next post!

Agile@School 2017 – let’s start over

Agile@School 2017 – let’s start over

As a recurring project, Agile@School is started again on February, with a new set of projects and ideas. Gabriele will help me again, but it will be a very difficult task. During the past year we followed a Scrum approach, in order to comply the team structure. As you can read here, there were one team with a small bunch of members. Now, we’re getting “bigger”. As a result, we’ll have micro-teams of two/three member each. Great chance for Kanban. Let’s give it a try.

01

How will we approach in the beginning?

  • defining a set of micro-team, that we call “task forces”
  • designing a Kanban board
  • describing personas
  • speaking of some ceremonies we’d like to get rid of
  • speaking of some ceremonies we’ll keep
  • describing the customer journey and the story map practices

The task forces

The term not fits very well, actually; indeed, a task force is something that could be considered as a “defcon 1” team. However, we would give the teams a label which is “strong”. To be honest, we have a little amount of time, so in the end we can say that we’re in hurry already 🙂

The Kanbard board

As we said above, we will have more task forces, most likely six. Therefore, the board will use columns (as usual) for the status management and rows (aka Swimlanes) for separating teams and projects.

02

The board will be created in Visual Studio Team Services, in order to use also the Source Control Manager which relies on it.

Personas

Each team member will populate a simple card, the Persona card, which is depicted in the picture below:

03

As you can see (in Italian), the first column is for Persona details, the second for interests and the third is the “role” which the member would like to have. I know that the last column is not included in any best practice, but I feel that some student could start to think about its job and its future. Could be interesting.

The customer journey

During the next meeting, we’ll ask the students to show us their customer journey. Each team will have to describe the journey of a typical user, with mood for each action it takes and the value which it gets by the action itself.

Conclusions

Kanban, task forces, boards, customer journey, personas, etc. This year is full of new things to get knowledge from. Also the source control manager will change. We will use git on VSTS so we will get different projects in the same place in a quicker way.

And now, let’s start over! 🙂

How to share redgate database tools settings with Team Foundation Service

How to share redgate database tools settings with Team Foundation Service

In a previous post we’ve seen how to share the SQL Prompt snippet folder to the development team. We’ve used dropbox for sharing and powershell to copy files between the default directory and the new place (changing also the related registry keys). In this post we’ll focus on how to share all the Red-Gate development tools using Team Foundation Server or Team Foundation Service for team sharing (TFService and TFS Express are two free solution).

The requirements are:
– at least a folder, that will be shared to all team members
– the tools must support the customization of the configuration folders
– a script (powershell in the following samples) that can change the configuration folders

Keep in mind that we’re talking about third party tools, plugged in to SQL Server Management Studio. We will speak about:

  • SQL Prompt snippets (we will change snippet folder)
  • SQL Compare filter and project files (we will change filter and project file startup folder, .scp and .scpf files)
  • SQL Data Compare project files (we will change project file startup folder, .sdc files)

We’ll use Team Foundation Service as a Source Control Manager Continue reading